Sunday, November 30, 2014

MS14-063 A Potential XP Exploit

This post was written by Marcin Noga with contributions by Earl Carter and Martin Lee.

New vulnerabilities for old operating systems may not seem particularly interesting, until you consider the large number of legacy machines running outdated versions of Windows. Windows XP has reached its end of life, meaning that new vulnerabilities will not be patched. In this post we will show that a recent vulnerability can be used as a platform for exploiting Windows XP.

In October, Microsoft released a bulletin for a privilege escalation vulnerability in the FASTFAT driver that was released as:

MS14-063 -- Vulnerability in FAT32 Disk Partition Driver Could Allow Elevation of Privilege (2998579)CVE-2014-4115.

Let me present some of the most interesting parts of the advisory and add some details from my own research.

When the bug kicks in…


In the advisory, Microsoft indicates that the following OS’s are vulnerable:

  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 SP2
  • Vista SP2
  • Server 2008 SP2

The Microsoft bulletin does not mention Windows XP, since Windows XP is no longer supported. According to my research, however, this vulnerability is also present in the Windows XP FASTFAT driver.

See the following video.

This vulnerability can be exploited on Windows XP SP3 using a malicious usb stick with a malformed FAT32 partition. Let’s examine the reaction when the USB is inserted into the system.

Monday, November 24, 2014

Cisco Coverage for 'Regin' Campaign

This post was authored by Alex Chiu with contributions from Joel Esler.
 
Advanced persistent threats are a problem that many companies and organizations of all sizes face. In the past two days, information regarding a highly targeted campaign known as ‘Regin’ has been publicly disclosed.  The threat actors behind ‘Regin’ appear to be targeting organizations in the Financial, Government, and Telecommunications verticals as well as targeting research institutions in the Education vertical.  Talos is aware of these reports and has responded to the issue in order to ensure our customers are protected.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Reversing Multilayer .NET Malware

This post was authored by Dave McDaniel with contributions from Jaeson Schultz.
Recently, we came across a malware sample that has been traversing the Internet disguised as an image of a woman. The malware sample uses several layers of obfuscation to hide its payload, including the use of steganography. Steganography is the practice of concealing a message, image, or file within another message, image, or file. Steganography can be used in situations where encryption might bring unwanted attention. Encrypted traffic from an unusual source is going to draw unwanted attention. Steganography allows malicious payloads to hide in plain sight. It also allows the attacker to bypass security devices. In our sample malware, steganography is used to decrypt and execute a second dropper, which in turn installs a user-land rootkit to further hide its intentions. The rootkit adds another layer of obfuscation by installing a DarkComet backdoor, using RC4 encryption to encrypt its configuration settings and send data to its command and control server.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Microsoft Update Tuesday November 2014: Fixes for 3 0-day Vulnerabilities

This month Microsoft is releasing 14 security bulletins. Originally they had planned to release 16, but due to issues that emerged in late testing, two bulletins that were announced in the Advance Security Notification, MS14-068 and MS14-075, have been postponed. Of the 14 bulletins, four are considered critical, eight are important, while two are moderate. They cover a total of 33 CVEs.

Friday, November 7, 2014

Talos Discovered Three More Vulnerabilities in Pidgin

This post was authored by Yves Younan and edited by Armin Pelkmann.

Table of contents

CVE-2014-3697, VRT-2014-0205
CVE-2014-3696, VRT-2014-0204
CVE-2014-3695, VRT-2014-0203

Cisco Talos is announcing the discovery and patching of another three 3 CVE vulnerabilities in Pidgin (An open-source multi-platform instant messaging client - see wikipedia page). These vulnerabilities were discovered by our team and reported to the Pidgin team. They were found during our initial look at Pidgin which resulted in the first 4 vulnerabilities released in January, but were reported to Pidgin a little later and took longer to get patched. Now that these vulnerabilities were patched in the latest version of Pidgin, 2.10.10, we want to publicly disclose our findings.



The first vulnerability (CVE-2014-3697, VRT-2014-0205) is in the routines Pidgin uses to handle smiley and theme packages in Windows. These packages can be downloaded from websites and installed by dragging and dropping them to Pidgin. The packages are TAR files and Pidgin handles them by un-tarring the files to a specific directory.