Wednesday, February 28, 2018

CannibalRAT targets Brazil




This post was authored by Warren Mercer and Vitor Ventura

Introduction


Talos has identified two different versions of a RAT, otherwise known as a remote access trojan, that has been written entirely in Python and is wrapped into a standalone executable. The RAT is impacting users of a Brazilian public sector management school.

The samples of two different versions of this RAT, both versions (3.0 and 4.0 according to the information within the samples analyzed) were written using Python and packed into an executable using a common tool called py2exe. The malware main script bytecode is stored in a portable executable (PE) section called PYTHONSCRIPT, while the Python DLL is stored in a section called PYTHON27.DLL. All the remaining modules' bytecode is compressed and stored in the executable overlay.

Both versions have all the usual RAT capabilities, however, during our investigation it became clear that version 4.0 (the latest) is a stripped-down version, where some features were removed, as explained later, to be part of a targeted campaign.

The target of such campaign are the users of INESAP - Instituto Nacional Escola Superior da Administração Pública, which is a Brazilian public sector management school that also does consulting work.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Who Wasn’t Responsible for Olympic Destroyer?

This blog post is authored by Paul Rascagneres and Martin Lee.


Summary


Absent contributions from traditional intelligence capacities, the available evidence linking the Olympic Destroyer malware to a specific threat actor group is contradictory, and does not allow for unambiguous attribution. The threat actor responsible for the attack has purposefully included evidence to frustrate analysts and lead researchers to false attribution flags. This false attribution could embolden an adversary to deny an accusation, publicly citing evidence based upon false claims by unwitting third parties. Attribution, while headline grabbing, is difficult and not an exact science. This must force one to question purely software-based attribution going forward.

Friday, February 23, 2018

Threat Round Up for Feb 16 - 23

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we've observed between February 16 and February 23. As with previous round-ups, this post isn't meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we've observed by highlighting key behavior characteristics, indicators of compromise, and how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Vulnerability Spotlight: Adobe Acrobat Reader DC Document ID Remote Code Execution Vulnerability


Discovered by Aleksandar Nikolic of Cisco Talos

Overview


Today, Talos is releasing details of a new vulnerability within Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. Adobe Acrobat Reader is the most popular and most feature-rich PDF reader. It has a big user base, is usually a default PDF reader on systems and integrates into web browsers as a plugin for rendering PDFs. As such, tricking a user into visiting a malicious web page or sending a specially crafted email attachment can be enough to trigger this vulnerability.

A specific Javascript script embedded in a PDF file can cause the document ID field to be used in an unbounded copy operation leading to stack-based buffer overflow when opening a specially crafted PDF document in Adobe Acrobat Reader DC 2018.009.20044. This stack overflow can lead to return address overwrite which can result in arbitrary code execution. In order to trigger this vulnerability, the victim would need to open the malicious file or access a malicious web page.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Beers with Talos EP23 - Eternal Fauxmance: Attribution Easter Eggs



Beers with Talos (BWT) Podcast Episode 23 is now available.  Download this episode and subscribe to Beers with Talos:

If iTunes and Google Play aren't your thing: www.talosintelligence.com/podcast

EP23 Show Notes: 


Recorded 2/16/18 - This week, Mitch learns about starting a show without Matt with no other plans to control Craig in place. The team discusses Olympic Destroyer and then takes on attribution in light of recent developments with Nyetya. We look at what attribution actually takes and the ease and commonality of planting false flags.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Talos Quarterly Threat Briefing - Winter 2018


Date: Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Time: 1:00pm ET/10:00am PT

Topic: Miners, Malspam, and Meltdowns 

Recording available here: http://cs.co/TalosQTB-Q218R


Space is limited for this event, so be sure to save your spot.  Following the webinar, the video will also be made available here.

In this edition of the Talos Quarterly Threat Briefing, Nick Biasini from Cisco Talos will discuss vital intel around the most prevalent and damaging threats of the last quarter.  Join the briefing to take a look at targeted attacks, get an intel on Necurs, and learn about the shift to malicious mining.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Threat Round Up for Feb 9 - Feb 16

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we've observed between February 9 and February 16. As with previous round-ups, this post isn't meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we've observed by highlighting key behavior characteristics, indicators of compromise, and how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

COINHOARDER: Tracking a Ukrainian Bitcoin Phishing Ring DNS Style

This post is authored by Jeremiah O'Connor and Dave Maynor with contributions from Artsiom Holub and Austin McBride. 

Executive Summary


Cisco has been tracking a bitcoin theft campaign for over 6 months. The campaign was discovered internally and researched with the aid of an intelligence sharing partnership with Ukraine Cyberpolice. The campaign was very simple and after initial setup the attackers needed only to continue purchasing Google AdWords to ensure a steady stream of victims. This campaign targeted specific geographic regions and allowed the attackers to amass millions in revenue through the theft of cryptocurrency from victims. This campaign demonstrates just how lucrative these sorts of malicious attacks can be for cybercriminals. Additionally, the revenue generated by these sorts of attacks, can then be reinvested into other cybercriminal operations.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Microsoft Patch Tuesday - February 2018

Microsoft Patch Tuesday - February 2018

Today Microsoft has released its monthly set of security advisories for vulnerabilities that have been identified and addressed in various products. This month's advisory release addresses 54 new vulnerabilities with 14 of them rated critical, 38 of them rated important, and 2 of them rated Moderate. These vulnerabilities impact Outlook, Edge, Scripting Engine, App Container, Windows, and more.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Olympic Destroyer Takes Aim At Winter Olympics



This blog post is authored by Warren Mercer and Paul Rascagneres. Ben Baker and Matthew Molyett contributed to this post.

Update 2/13 08:30 We have updated the information regarding the use of stolen credentials

Update 2/12 12:00: We have updated the destructor section with action taken against mapped file shares


Summary


The Winter Olympics this year is being held in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The Guardian, a UK Newspaper reported an article that suggested the Olympic computer systems suffered technical issues during the opening ceremony. Officials at the games confirmed some technical issues to non-critical systems and they completed recovery within around 12 hours. Sunday 11th February the Olympic games officials confirmed a cyber attack occurred but did not comment or speculate further.

Talos have identified the samples, with moderate confidence, used in this attack. The infection vector is currently unknown as we continue to investigate. The samples identified, however, are not from adversaries looking for information from the games but instead they are aimed to disrupt the games. The samples analysed appear to perform only destructive functionality. There does not appear to be any exfiltration of data. Analysis shows that actors are again favouring legitimate pieces of software as PsExec functionality is identified within the sample. The destructive nature of this malware aims to render the machine unusable by deleting shadow copies, event logs and trying to use PsExec & WMI to further move through the environment. This is something we have witnessed previously with BadRabbit and Nyetya.

Friday, February 9, 2018

Threat Round Up for Feb 2 - Feb 9

Today, Talos is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we've observed between February 2 and February 9. As with previous round-ups, this post isn't meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we've observed by highlighting key behavior characteristics, indicators of compromise, and how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of date of publication. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Targeted Attacks In The Middle East

This blog post is authored by Paul Rascagneres with assistance of Martin Lee.

Executive Summary


Talos has identified a targeted attacks affecting the Middle East. This campaign contains the following elements, which are described in detail in this article.

  • The use of allegedly confidential decoy documents purported to be written by the Jordanian publishing and research house, Dar El-Jaleel. This institute is known for their research of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the Sunni-Shia conflict within Iran.
  • The attacker extensively used scripting languages (VBScript, PowerShell, VBA) as part of their attack. These scripts are used to dynamically load and execute VBScript functions retrieved from a Command & Control server.
  • The attacker demonstrates excellent operational security (OPSEC). The attacker was particularly careful to camouflage their infrastructure. During our investigation, the attacker deployed several reconnaissance scripts in order to check the validity of victim machine, blocking systems that don't meet their criteria. The attacker uses the reputable CloudFlare system to hide the nature and location of their infrastructure. Additionally, the attacker filters connections based on their User-Agent strings, and only enables their infrastructure for short periods of time before blocking all connections.

This is not the first targeted campaign against the region that uses Dar El-Jaleel decoy documents which we have investigated. However, we have no indication that the previous campaigns are related.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Beers with Talos EP 22: Forget the ASA, Rob Joyce Favorited Craig’s Tweet



Beers with Talos (BWT) Podcast Episode 22 is now available.  Download this episode and subscribe to Beers with Talos:

If iTunes and Google Play aren't your thing: www.talosintelligence.com/podcast

EP22 Show Notes: 

Recorded 2/2/18 - Guests two EPs in a row! We are joined by Omar Santos from Cisco PSIRT to discuss CVE-2018-0101, the Cisco ASA Remote Code Execution and Denial of Service Vulnerability. See the PSIRT post below for latest updates. We also discuss Crypto miners overtaking ransomware, a Flash 0-day carrying a known ROKRAT payload (huh??), and we couldn’t escape discussing Autosploit because Rob Joyce faved one of Craig’s tweets.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Flash 0-Day In The Wild: Group 123 At The Controls

This blog post is authored by Warren Mercer and Paul Rascagneres.

Executive Summary


The 1st of February, Adobe published an advisory concerning a Flash vulnerability (CVE-2018-4878). This vulnerability is a use after free that allows Remote Code Execute through a malformed Flash object. Additionally KISA (Korean CERT) published an advisory about a Flash 0-day used in the wild. Talos identified that an attacker exploited this vulnerability with a Flash object embedded in a Microsoft Excel document. By opening the document, the exploit was executed in order to download an additional payload from a compromised website.

We identified that the downloaded payload is the well-known Remote Administration Tool named ROKRAT. We already extensively spoke about this RAT on several articles in this blog: here, here, here and here. It is particularity used with cloud platforms in order to exfiltrate documents and manage infected systems.