Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple Vulnerabilities in Yi Technology Home Camera


Vulnerabilities Discovered by Lilith [x_x] of Cisco Talos.

Overview


Cisco Talos is disclosing multiple vulnerabilities in the firmware of the Yi Technology Home Camera. In order to prevent the exploitation of these vulnerabilities, Talos worked with Yi Technology to make sure a newer version of the firmware is available to users. These vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to gain remote code execution on the devices via a command injection, bypass methods of network authentication, or disable the device.

The Yi Home Camera is an internet-of-things (IoT) home camera sold globally. The 27US version is one of the newer models sold in the U.S. and is the most basic model out of the Yi Technology camera lineup.

It includes all the functions that one would expect from an IoT device, including the ability to view the camera's feed from anywhere, offline storage, subscription-based cloud storage and easy setup.

There are many consequences to a security vulnerability within the firmware of this security camera. An attacker could exploit these vulnerabilities to:

  • Disable the camera to prevent it from recording.
  • Delete stored videos on the camera.
  • View video feeds from the camera.
  • Potentially launch attacks against the camera owner's phone app.
  • Act as a foothold into the home network to attack other devices inside.


This list is not complete, and many other consequences could occur, so Talos highly recommends that the devices are patched as soon as possible via the Yi Home application.

Anatomy of a sextortion scam

This blog was written by Jaeson Schultz.

Since this July, attackers are increasingly spreading sextortion-type attacks across the internet. Cisco Talos has been investigating these campaigns over the past few months. In many cases the spammers harvested email addresses and passwords from a publicly available data breach, and then used this data to facilitate their sextortion attacks. While the attackers do not actually have any compromising videos showing the victim, the emails claim to have explicit videos that they will distribute if the victim doesn't pay the extortion payment by a certain time. By including the recipient's password along with their demands for payment, the attackers hope to legitimize their claims about having compromising material concerning the victim. While these attacks have been in the wild for months, Talos wanted to take a closer look at some of these campaigns to see why users were being tricked into sending the attackers large amounts of bitcoin despite the attackers' empty threats. By examining some of the sextortion spam campaigns in detail, our researchers were able to gain insight into how these criminals operate.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Talos Vulnerability Discovery Year in Review - 2018


Introduction


Cisco Talos' Vulnerability Discovery Team investigates software and operating system vulnerabilities in order to discover them before malicious threat actors. We provide this information to vendors so that they can create patches and protect their customers as soon as possible. We strive to improve the security of our customers with detection content, which protects them while the vendor is creating, testing, and delivering the patch. These patches ultimately remove the vulnerability in question, which increases security not only for our customers but for everyone. Once these patches become available, the Talos detection content becomes public, as well. You can find all of the release information via the Talos vulnerability information page here.

Over the past several years, our research team has improved the pace at which we disclose vulnerabilities. Talos increased the number of vulnerabilities it disclosed 22 percent year-over-year, and we hope to continue to grow that number. As of Oct. 23, Cisco has updated it's vendor vulnerability and discovery policy. You can read the complete details here.

Monday, October 29, 2018

GPlayed's younger brother is a banker — and it's after Russian banks

This blog post is authored by Vitor Ventura.

Introduction


Cisco Talos published its findings on a new Android trojan known as "GPlayed" on Oct. 11. At the time, we wrote that the trojan seemed to be in the testing stages of development, based on the malware's code patterns, strings and telemetry visibility. Since then, we discovered that there's already a predecessor to GPlayed, which we are calling "GPlayed Banking." Unlike the first version of GPlayed, this is not an all-encompassing banking trojan. It is specifically a banking trojan that's looking to target Sberbank AutoPay users, a service offered by the Russian state-owned bank.

GPlayed Banking is spread in a similar way to the original GPlayed. It's disguised as a fake Google app store, but actually installs the malware once it's launched. This further illustrates the point that Android users need to be educated on how to spot a malicious app, and that they should be careful as to what privileges they assign to certain programs.
The malicious application is on the left-hand side.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Threat Roundup for October 19 to October 26


Today, Talos is is publishing a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we've observed between Oct. 19 and Oct. 26. As with previous roundups, this post isn't meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, this post will summarize the threats we've observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics, indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Vulnerability Spotlight: Talos-2018-0694 - MKVToolNix mkvinfo read_one_element Code Execution Vulnerability


Piotr Bania, Cory Duplantis and Martin Zeiser of Cisco Talos discovered this vulnerability.

Overview


Today, Cisco Talos is disclosing a vulnerability that we identified in the MKVToolNix mkvinfo utility that parses the Matroska file format video files (.mkv files).

MKVToolNix is a set of tools to create, alter and inspect Matroska files on Linux, Windows and other operating systems.

Matroska is a file format for storing common multimedia content, like movies or TV shows, with implementations consisting of mostly of open-source software. Matroska file extensions are MKV for video, MK3D for stereoscopic video, MKA for audio-only files and MKS for subtitle-only files.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: TALOS-2018-0635/0636 - Sophos HitmanPro.Alert memory disclosure and code execution vulnerabilities

Marcin Noga of Cisco Talos discovered this vulnerability.


Overview

Cisco Talos is disclosing two vulnerabilities in Sophos HitmanPro.Alert, a malware detection and protection tool. Both vulnerabilities lie in the input/output control (IOCTL) message handler. One could allow an attacker to read kernel memory contents, while the other allows code execution and privilege escalation. Both vulnerabilities were patched by Sophos in version 3.7.9.759.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Beers with Talos EP40: BWT XL feat. SuperMicro, Giant Patches, and More Mobile Malware



Beers with Talos (BWT) Podcast Ep. #40 is now available. Download this episode and subscribe to Beers with Talos:

If iTunes and Google Play aren't your thing, click here.

Ep. #40 show notes: 

Recorded Oct. 19, 2018 — In celebration of episode No. 40 and hitting over 1 million downloads(!!!), we go XL. This episode is a bit long, but we go a bit deeper than usual to discuss a few things that are highly unusual — namely, the extra-large patches dropped by Oracle, and the extra-large questions surrounding the Bloomberg/Super Micro story. We also talk about a few mobile threats we have seen and what we have brewing in the mobile threat space.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Threat Roundup for October 12 to October 19


Today, as we do every week, Talos is giving you a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed this week — covering the dates between Oct. 12 and 19. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, we will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics and indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Beers with Talos EP 39: VB 2018 Rundown and Prevalent Problems with PDF



Beers with Talos (BWT) Podcast Ep. #39 is now available. Download this episode and subscribe to Beers with Talos:

If iTunes and Google Play aren't your thing, click here.

Ep. #39 show notes: 

Recorded Oct. 5, 2018 - We start out with a quick chat to get to know this week’s special guests from the Talos Outreach team: Paul Rascagneres, Vanja Svajcer and Warren Mercer. We discuss everyone’s work that was presented at Virus Bulletin, as well as Paul and Warren being nominated for the Péter Szőr Award. We also cover a lot of vulnerability discovery work that we recently released around various PDF software.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Tracking Tick Through Recent Campaigns Targeting East Asia

This blog post is authored by Ashlee Benge and Jungsoo An, with contributions from Dazhuo Li.

Summary



Since 2016, an advanced threat group that Cisco Talos is tracking has carried out cyberattacks against South Korea and Japan. This group is known by several different names: Tick, Redbaldknight and Bronze Butler.

Although each campaign employed custom tools, Talos has observed recurring patterns in the actor's use of infrastructure, from overlaps in hijacked command and control (C2) domains to differing campaign C2s resolving to the same IP. These infrastructure patterns indicate similarities between the Datper, xxmm backdoor, and Emdivi malware families. In this post, we will dive into these parallels and examine the methods used by this actor.

Vulnerability Spotlight: Live Networks LIVE555 streaming media RTSPServer code execution vulnerability



These vulnerabilities were discovered by Lilith Wyatt of Cisco Talos.

Cisco Talos is disclosing a code execution vulnerability that has been identified in Live Networks LIVE555 streaming media RTSPServer.

LIVE555 Streaming Media is a set of open-source C++ libraries developed by Live Networks Inc. for multimedia streaming. The libraries support open standards such as RTP/RTCP and RTSP for streaming, and can also manage video RTP payload formats such as H.264, H.265, MPEG, VP8, and DV, and audio RTP payload formats such as MPEG, AAC, AMR, AC-3 and Vorbis. It is used internally by well-known software such as VLC and MPlayer.

An exploitable code execution vulnerability exists in the HTTP packet-parsing functionality of the LIVE555 RTSP server library, which is not part of media players, but interacts with them. A specially crafted packet can cause a stack-based buffer overflow, resulting in code execution. An attacker can send a packet to trigger this vulnerability.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: Linksys ESeries Multiple OS Command Injection Vulnerabilities



These vulnerabilities were discovered by Jared Rittle of Cisco Talos.

Cisco Talos is disclosing several vulnerabilities in the operating system on the Linksys E Series of routers.

Multiple exploitable OS command injection vulnerabilities exist in the Linksys E Series line of routers. An attacker can exploit these bugs by sending an authenticated HTTP request to the network configuration. An attacker could then gain the ability to arbitrarily execute code on the machine.

Monday, October 15, 2018

Old dog, new tricks - Analysing new RTF-based campaign distributing Agent Tesla, Loki with PyREbox

This blog post was authored by Edmund Brumaghin and Holger Unterbrink with contributions from Emmanuel Tacheau.


Executive Summary


Cisco Talos has discovered a new malware campaign that drops the sophisticated information-stealing trojan called "Agent Tesla," and other malware such as the Loki information stealer. Initially, Talos' telemetry systems detected a highly suspicious document that wasn't picked up by common antivirus solutions. However, Threat Grid, Cisco's unified malware analysis and threat intelligence platform, identified the unknown file as malware. The adversaries behind this malware use a well-known exploit chain, but modified it in such a way so that antivirus solutions don't detect it. In this post, we will outline the steps the adversaries took to remain undetected, and why it's important to use more sophisticated software to track these kinds of attacks. If undetected, Agent Tesla has the ability to steal user's login information from a number of important pieces of software, such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Outlook and many others. It can also be used to capture screenshots, record webcams, and allow attackers to install additional malware on infected systems.

Friday, October 12, 2018

Threat Roundup for October 5 to October 12


Today, as we do every week, Talos is giving you a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed this week — covering the dates between Oct. 5 and 12. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, we will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics and indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

GPlayed Trojan - .Net playing with Google Market

This blog post is authored by Vitor Ventura.

Introduction

In a world where everything is always connected, and mobile devices are involved in individuals' day-to-day lives more and more often, malicious actors are seeing increased opportunities to attack these devices. Cisco Talos has identified the latest attempt to penetrate mobile devices — a new Android trojan that we have dubbed "GPlayed." This is a trojan with many built-in capabilities. At the same time, it's extremely flexible, making it a very effective tool for malicious actors. The sample we analyzed uses an icon very similar to Google Apps, with the label "Google Play Marketplace" to disguise itself.

The malicious application is on the left-hand side.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Microsoft WindowsCodecs.dll SniffAndConvertToWideString Information Leak Vulnerability

These vulnerabilities were discovered by Marcin Noga of Cisco Talos.

Today, Cisco Talos is disclosing a vulnerability in the WindowsCodecs.dll component of the Windows operating system.

WindowsCodecs.dll is a component library that exists in the implementation of Windows Imaging Component (WIC), which provides a framework for working with images and their data. WIC makes it possible for independent software vendors (ISVs) and independent hardware vendors (IHVs) to develop their own image codecs and get the same platform support as standard image formats (ex. TIFF, JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP and HDPhoto).

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: VMWare Workstation DoS Vulnerability

Today, Cisco Talos is disclosing a vulnerability in VMware Workstation that could result in denial of service. VMware Workstation is a widely used virtualization platform designed to run alongside a normal operating system, allowing users to use both virtualized and physical systems concurrently.

TALOS-2018-0589

Discovered by Piotr Bania of Cisco Talos

Microsoft Patch Tuesday — October 18: Vulnerability disclosures and Snort coverage

Microsoft released its monthly security update today, disclosing a variety of vulnerabilities in several of its products. The latest Patch Tuesday covers 49 vulnerabilities, 12 of which are rated "critical," 34 that are rated "important,” two that are considered to have “moderate” severity and one that’s rated as “low.”

The advisories cover bugs in the Chakra scripting engine, the Microsoft Edge internet browser and the Microsoft Office suite of products, among other software.

This update also includes a critical advisory that covers updates to the Microsoft Office suite of products.

Please visit the SNORTⓇ blog here if you would like to know more about the coverage we have for these vulnerabilities.

Vulnerability in the Intel Unified Shader compiler for the Intel Graphics Accelerator

Vulnerabilities discovered by Piotr Bania of Cisco Talos

Talos is disclosing a pointer corruption vulnerability in the Intel Unified Shader compiler for the Intel Graphics Accelerator.


Overview

In order for the graphics to be produced, the graphics accelerators need to process the OpenGL scripts into actual graphics. That process is named "shader compilation." On the Intel Graphics accelerator, this is done inside the igdusc64 dynamic linked library (DLL), and this is where the vulnerability exists.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Threat Roundup Sept 28 - Oct 5

Today, as we do every week, Talos is giving you a glimpse into the most prevalent threats we’ve observed this week — covering the dates between Sept. 28 and Oct. 5. As with previous roundups, this post isn’t meant to be an in-depth analysis. Instead, we will summarize the threats we’ve observed by highlighting key behavioral characteristics and indicators of compromise, and discussing how our customers are automatically protected from these threats.

As a reminder, the information provided for the following threats in this post is non-exhaustive and current as of the date of publication. Additionally, please keep in mind that IOC searching is only one part of threat hunting. Spotting a single IOC does not necessarily indicate maliciousness. Detection and coverage for the following threats is subject to updates, pending additional threat or vulnerability analysis. For the most current information, please refer to your Firepower Management Center, Snort.org, or ClamAV.net.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: Google PDFium JBIG2 Image ComposeToOpt2WithRect Information Disclosure Vulnerability


Discovered by Aleksandar Nikolic of Cisco Talos

Overview


Cisco Talos is releasing details of a new vulnerability in Google PDFium's JBIG2 library. An exploitable out-of-bounds read on the heap vulnerability exists in the JBIG2-parsing code in Google Chrome, version 67.0.3396.99. A specially crafted PDF document can trigger an out-of-bounds read, which can possibly lead to an information leak. That leak could be used as part of an exploit. An attacker needs to trick the user into visiting a malicious site to trigger the vulnerability.

In accordance with our coordinated disclosure policy, Cisco Talos has worked with Google to ensure that these issues have been resolved and that an update has been made available for affected users. It is recommended that this update is applied as quickly as possible to ensure that systems are no longer affected by this vulnerability.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

BruCON Primer: 10 Years and Cisco Talos Talks

Cisco Talos will have a significant presence at the 10th edition of BruCON, which kicks off this week. Below, you will find the presentations that Talos researchers will give, along with a brief overview of the topics they will discuss. We are fortunate to have multiple speakers presenting this year: Benny Ketelslegers, Jared Rittle and Lilith Wyatt.

Vulnerability Spotlight: Adobe Acrobat Reader DC Collab reviewServer Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Discovered by Aleksandar Nikolic of Cisco Talos

Overview

Today, Cisco Talos is releasing details of a new vulnerability within Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. Adobe Acrobat Reader is the most popular and most feature-rich PDF reader. It has a large user base, is usually a default PDF reader on systems and integrates into web browsers as a plugin for rendering PDFs. As such, tricking a user into visiting a malicious web page or sending a specially crafted email attachment can be enough to trigger this vulnerability. The one method call required to trigger this vulnerability is privileged and can only be called from trusted functions or a trusted location. Additionally, the use-after-free condition is only triggered upon closing the application.

Monday, October 1, 2018

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple Issues in Foxit PDF Reader


Vulnerabilities discovered by Aleksandar Nikolic of Cisco Talos

Overview


Cisco Talos is disclosing eightteen vulnerabilities in Foxit PDF Reader, a popular free program for viewing, creating and editing PDF documents. It is commonly used as an alternative to Adobe Acrobat Reader and has a widely used browser plugin.

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple vulnerabilities in Atlantis Word Processor

Vulnerabilities discovered by Cory Duplantis of Cisco Talos.


Overview


Cisco Talos is disclosing several vulnerabilities discovered in Atlantis Word Processor. Atlantis Word Processor is a portable word processor that is also capable of converting any TXT, RTF, ODT, DOC, WRI, or DOCX document into an eBook in the ePub format.